San Francisco Mission Street Vendors Protest Against Three-Month Ban

Street vendors in San Francisco’s Mission District are protesting against a three-month ban on street vending, which went into effect on Monday. The ban was initiated by Supervisor Hilary Ronen over concerns about illegal vending, stolen goods sales, and other crimes. During the ban, only 50 permitted vendors will be able to set up shop daily at the Tiangue Marketplace at 2137 Mission St., and nine will be at La Placita, an outdoor parking lot on 24th Street between Capp and Lilac streets, Tuesdays through Saturdays.

The street vendors are struggling to figure out solutions as they are left without a source of income for the next 90 days. They are urging city officials to postpone the ban until after the holidays. The vendors argue that the ban will hurt their livelihoods and that they have been unfairly targeted by the city. They have also expressed concerns that the ban will lead to increased police harassment and displacement of the Latino community.

The city has invited the Latino Task Force to help match vendors with resources and services to help them during the ban. Additionally, the city will host a resource fair on December 15. Supervisor Ronen has emphasized that safety in the Mission is paramount and that the chaos on the street must end. However, she has also expressed empathy for the vendors’ situation and has fought for economic opportunities for newcomers.

The ban on street vending in San Francisco’s Mission District has sparked protests and controversy. While the city aims to address concerns about illegal vending and crime, street vendors argue that the ban will hurt their livelihoods and lead to increased police harassment and displacement of the Latino community. The city has invited the Latino Task Force to help match vendors with resources and services to help them during the ban, and a resource fair is scheduled for December 15.